All Antony has to do is introduce that four-word qualifier, "if it were so," to form the crux of his argument to come. And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. (The word derives from the same etymological root as "stare," the Old English verb starian.) He hath brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Notice how Antony subtly plugs in the language of doubt; "Brutus tells you Caesar was ambitious" is a lot different than "Caesar was ambitious." Term. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? Antony, according to his agreement with Brutus, must acknowledge that he is speaking by permission (under leave) of the conspirators. When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? 486 Views. And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. He was my friend, faithful and just to me. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? Every time he says this, it draws Brutus in an increasingly harsher light. Grievous here denotes "deserving of censure or punishment" in context, but sets up a play upon the word in the line that follows. Antony is grandstanding with his rhetorical question. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. ... Antony: "He hath brought many captives home to Rome / Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. As it stands, it's just as easy to read general as a dactyl substitution in a predominantly iambic line. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? Also, while Antony is clearly referring to Caesar in the line and the one that follows, it's not hard to imagine him making a subtle innuendo here about the conspirators. This line features another trochaic inversion around the caesura marked by the comma. The line is all but a throwaway; Antony doesn't want the crowd dwelling on the idea that he is speaking here by permission. 0. He was my friend, faithful and just to me, But Brutus says he was ambitious, And Brutus is an honorable man. When the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept. O judgment! what did that do? Also, for the novice orator who may have to recite this, be very wary of this line. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? He says that Caesar had brought in numerous captives to Rome and to free these captive, their count ires had to pay ransoms or money. This is another way that Antony uses circumlocution to call Brutus's account into question without ever averring that Brutus is a liar. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Antony: "You all did see that … – He hath brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? Ambition should me made of sterner stuff, yet Brutus says, he was ambitious and … – When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath … And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. Antony hearkens back over the next three lines to the ceremony described by Casca in Act I, sc. He hath brought many captives home to Rome. Although it's probably overanalyzing Shakespeare's intent, the line marks the point where Antony, satisfied that he has placated the crowd, begins the whittling away at the reasoning behind Caesar's assassination. Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? "He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill" Was Shakespeare genuinely unaware that most of the Gallic "captives" Caesar sent to Rome just became slaves, rather than being "ransomed" & send back to their homeland? Yet … Copyright © 1997–2020, J. M. Pressley and the Shakespeare Resource Center Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? This is a calculated tactic to disarm a crowd firmly on the side of Brutus when Antony takes the pulpit. Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read— ... On this side Tiber; he hath left them you, And to your heirs for ever, common pleasures, To walk abroad, and recreate yourselves. It's tempting to think that Shakespeare meant general (meaning "public" in this context) to be pronounced more like gen'ral to adhere more strictly to iambic meter. He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. The irony as he returns to the phrase throughout his speech is dependent upon a progressive contrast between Antony's words and his inflection. Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. 100 When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept; Ambition should be made of sterner stuff. You all did see that on the Lupercal: 95 You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? 0. 90 : When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, William Shakespeare: He was my friend, faithful, and just to me, but Brutus says, he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest– For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men– Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral. ... Antony: "He hath brought many captives home to Rome / Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. Presented him a kingly crown, meaning of ransoms Ambition should be made of sterner stuff becoming king realm possibility... In doing so, Antony can focus on sawing the limb out from under 's. 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